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Washed Out Bevels.

Discussion in 'Working the Steel' started by poppa bear, Mar 7, 2016.

  1. poppa bear

    poppa bear Member

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    Whats your view. I personally like the look of what I call hidden/washed out bevels. It makes it smoother and love the look of no transition point from blade edge to belly/body of the blade. Maybe a shallow hollow grind but a lovely flat with no tradition to me is awesome.

    Some make a big deal out of it and call it too amateur a look for a blade with no explained reason.

    View point and input on this one two please.
     
  2. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]

    Jay Fishers take on the blade grind
    [​IMG]
     
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  3. Mythtaken

    Mythtaken Staff Member CKM Staff

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    It's really just Maker's choice, in my opinion. Sometimes you might want well defined bevels and such to give the finished blade a particular look. Other times, you want soft lines or no lines to focus attention more on the blade material (e.g., pattern welded steel) or the handle.
     
  4. bobbybirds

    bobbybirds Best New Maker

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    I like a nice crisp grind line usually, but it depends on the knife.
     
  5. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    The lines give a certain interest and geometry to the blade. Like Tim says, it's more about the look of the finished product.

    A very skilled maker can walk away from the grinder with a finished blade. That is certainly not me, I almost always do some kind of hand finishing.
    It can be difficult (but not impossible) to maintain crisp grind lines when hand finishing.

    I've always made the excuse that "I like making kitchen knives because they are easier to grind."

    Although there are a few good videos out there, I found this one to be informative. Note how he alternates from across grinding to lengthwise grinding. The lengthwise pass really brings out a sharp line.



    Happy grinding,

    Dan
     
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  6. Grayzer86

    Grayzer86 Active Member

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    Personally i have never liked the look of a washed out convex. I much prefer a full flat or a partial height grind that has crisp transitions from the bevel to the flat. Its personal preference, but I believe most see clean crisp grinds as a mark of quality and skill from a maker. With a crisp line its impossible to hide a bevel flaw in height or depth, and is typically a sign of a maker who has high skill in grinding and finishing. Filtering through a huge number of new maker threads on other forums shows the typical washed out transition. This convexing allows one to hide bevel irregularities by simply convexing over them and blending them in. Im not saying that its only amateurs that grind this way, but its a common trait for them and thats where the "amateur look" feelings come from. There are also accomplished makers who do excellent convexes with proper geometry. Its also very common with these types of grind, that they are actually FAR too convex. Many use a slack belt and grind from the edge up to their desired height. This leaves a bulbous bevel like an axe, and far too much thickness behind the edge to do much other than baton wood properly. The correct way to do it would be to do a clean even flat grind to your desired angle, and then convex over the upper grind transition and edge, allowing proper cutting geometry. Each detail works together to give an overall impression of quality. When people see nice crisp grind lines, dead even plunges, symmetrical taper, tight seams and joints, each one of these helps build a feeling of high quality for the customer or buyer. I look at it in a similar fashion to handle material. Some like the look of dymondwood and it has its place, but you will never see it on a knife from a high end maker, such as Nick Wheeler, Kyle Royer, Bruce Bump, or Don Hanson. The fact that many beginners start with it as a handle material has given it the stigma that it is a cheap or less desirable material. In actuality its a fine material and actually performs very well in use, but it can give an amateur feel to the overall project. Given two identical bowies, one with dymondwood and one with stunning Koa, one seems more amateur. Take the same two knives, both with Koa handle, and give one perfectly crisp grind lines, and one convex grinds with blended transitions, and again the majority of people will see the convex one as more amateur. This is just my opinion and probably worth exactly what everyone paid for it haha.
     
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  7. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    Watched most of the video and glad to see I am not out in left field with what I have learned so far in the world of grinding.

    Personally i prefer nice distinctive lines about 95% of the time and occasionally will smooth a transition out to see if it looks better. For example I did a Dagger grind on a fillet knife (boning) or a really large swage. Once it was done a very slight radius to the centerline actually looked good, plus getting it even was a challenge.

    For the most part the finished product has to look appealing and in most cases smooth straight lines will do that. Even if it means grinding all the way to the back of the knife
     
  8. Icho-

    Icho- Staff Member

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    Like Myth said, it is the makers choice so if the maker likes it it is correct to their style. For me personally if I accidentally wash out a grind line I let out a few choice words, stop what I am doing and figure out how to fix it. When it comes to fit and finish, grind lines are one of the first things I notice and look at unless there is something else that sticks out on a knife that is more noticeable. For me the next thing is looking at the cutting edge and plunge line. If the plunge line is not even I loose interest pretty quickly. My wife gives me crap quite often when I keep going back and touching up areas on my knives. lol
     
  9. poppa bear

    poppa bear Member

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    :beer:Very informative thanks
     
  10. SoberEdge

    SoberEdge StonehurstKnives on Instagram

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    For me, grind lines are the first thing I look at, symmetry at the plunge and the tip. I dont mind a convex edge buy I want to see the crisp lines.
     

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