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Variable Speed Kmg Grinder Vs. Tormek Style Sharpener

Discussion in 'Sharpening' started by RussGen, Jul 6, 2020.

  1. RussGen

    RussGen New Member

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    I'm thinking using the Tormek will get a blade sharper but does anyone know if the kmg using multiple belts will get a blade decently sharp using a slower speed. It doesn't seem to heat up much if you're careful. I'm considering the Tormak or something similar but I'd rather save the money if there's not a huge difference.
     
  2. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    I run slow belt speed from 800-2000 grit or 1200 grit then on to rhynowet sanding sheets up to 2500 grit.

    Depends on just how far you want to take sharpening you can get leather belts and run diamond paste or buy diamond belts.
    Personally I am cheap and carry wet and dry paper instead of stones and sharpen with that. Also works in the shop if you stick the sheets to a plate of glass
     
  3. RussGen

    RussGen New Member

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    I'm not really concerned with a razor edge since I make bush knives that will take a beating. I like the idea of the sanding sheets on glass. Think I'll try that.
     
  4. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Russ,

    I used to use an Edge Pro clone, but once I discovered how to do it on the grinder, I have never gone back.

    I use the topside slack portion of the belt. I slow the belt speed, anything around 1200 sf/m. I form the edge with a medium grit belt, say 220 to 320. If you want a "toothy" edge, leave it at 320 and knock off the wire by stropping. If you want to refine it further, try some it to 400, then 600 and then go on to stones and a leather strop until you are afraid of what you have created. Additional details here: https://www.canadianknifemaker.ca/index.php?threads/sharpening-honing-techniques.3571/#post-27774

    Interesting note, the belt weight plays a part in the cutting bevel shape. Heavier backing makes flat bevels, whereas supple J-weight backing make a more convex bevel. I haven't experimented much with the idea of making convex cutting bevels.

    Some guys swear by using worn belts, or even the backing side out to act like a strop. I am a little leery about the latter as I don't like the idea of the abrasive side running against my beautiful wheels. LOL BTW, @John Noon sells 2x72" leather belts that you can power strop with.

    @Kevin Cox showed me a video of his cool jig for putting the edge on. It's an adjustable swing arm that clamps the blade in. Run the belt in reverse (moving upwards) work the blade in the direction of the belt. This is a way to get fast, repeatable angles over a range of belts.

    Dan
     
    John Noon and Griff like this.
  5. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    Never thought to mention I make the leather belts :whistling I make them in any size and length up to 72"
     
  6. Griff

    Griff Active Member

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    Sharpening being the natural successor to a successful heat-treatment...it’s just one more thing you have to be good at! If it ain’t sharp...it ain’t a knife :D

    I am only now experimenting with sharpening on the grinder as I’ve been getting very good results on waterstones recently.

    I have one of John’s 2x72 leather belts...but I have yet to use it!
     
  7. RussGen

    RussGen New Member

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    I can see trying a lot of these methods. All seem worth a try. I picked up some of the stick on sheets John mentioned from Lee Valley today. I think I'll pass on the Tormak clone at Canadian Tire. It's on sale for 50% off til Wednesday if anybody is interested. Thanks
     
  8. Scott Kozub

    Scott Kozub New Member

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    A lot of guys insist that a belt will overheat the edge at the apex. They claim that many production knives need a couple sharpening before they can hold an edge because of this. I don't know. I take my knives down to a zero edge when grinding the bevels than sharpen them back on a stone and never have issues. This ensures a very thin TBE that only takes a few minutes on an Atoma diamond plate. Slow speed, light pressure, fresh belt and water if your really paranoid.If its a heavier use blade i'll leave a little more meat.

    Here's a link from larrin about this exact topic if you want to geek out a bit.

    https://knifesteelnerds.com/2019/04/08/does-sharpening-with-a-grinder-ruin-your-edge/
     
  9. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Another great article. Always something more to learn when it comes to making knives.
     

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