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Tormek - Diy Knock Off

Discussion in 'Sharpening' started by ToddR, Apr 15, 2019.

  1. ToddR

    ToddR Putterer, Tinkerer, Waster of Time Staff Member

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    Hi all. I attended a tool show recently and had a chance to use the tormek T8. I fell in love instantly. It would pretty much make all my other sharpening gadgets obsolete. But, as you know, super pricey. So, two questions.

    1. Does anybody here have any experience with one of the knock offs (Wen, Grizzly etc.) and have any reviews or suggestions to make about them?
    2. Does anybody know how (other than by stepping down with some seriously large pulleys) to find a motor that will spin at around 100rpm? I'm having 0 luck googling any AC motors that go that slow. I figured DC would be easier, maybe a gear motor? ) but I know zip about DC motors (not much about AC either). Any general advice there.

    Yes, if I could find something reasonable to power it, I'm considering making my own "Tormek-like" sharpener. I'd have to buy the wheels and make some jigs etc. but, in the end, we're really still talking about a motor spinning a stone wheel. I figure it's gotta be doable. (famous last words)
     
  2. Eric Fisher

    Eric Fisher Active Member

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    First question. How much motor power does it need?
     
  3. ToddR

    ToddR Putterer, Tinkerer, Waster of Time Staff Member

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    Thanks Eric. All i could find on the T8's motor was this:

    1/8HP, 115V, 1.7A, 60Hz, 100RPM
     
  4. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Gear reduction is the way to get 100 RPM. Most motors need some speed for their fans to keep them cool.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2019
  5. ToddR

    ToddR Putterer, Tinkerer, Waster of Time Staff Member

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    To be clear, you mean different size pulleys right? Not a DC gear motor or similar?
     
  6. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    The ratio you want is about 20:1 for a common four pole AC motor. This would mean a 1" sheave and a 20" sheave which isn't going to be very pretty. Even less pretty when you use multiple belts and shafts.
    The slowest commonly found AC induction motor is a six pole and they clock in around 1200 RPM. You will see these from time to time on Kijiji. Yes, more poles is slower, it's also more copper and usually cost more money. Some multi-speed furnace blower motors go down to 600 RPM. You might be able to salvage one of them and use a 6:1 reduction.

    What the band saw hackers use to slow a wood cutting band saw to metal cutting speeds is a reducing gearbox. https://www.surpluscenter.com/Power...r-0-50-HP-56C-Left-Output-13-133-20-L-56C.axd

    If I was going to hack something together, I would use an old variable speed corded drill, strap it down and chuck an arbor that can hold the stone. (chuck meaning insert into the chuck not chuck in the garbage can). It will sound very much like my Porta-Band when running...all whiny and grrrry.

    The wildest one I have seen used multiple sprockets from bicycles and chains for gear reduction. However cool that was from the high school mechanic DIY perspective, it was awesomely ugly and very pinchy looking.

    Or you can wait for this to go on sale at 50% off:
    https://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/maximum-pro-2-3a-tool-sharpener-0556758p.html

    Dan
     
  7. ToddR

    ToddR Putterer, Tinkerer, Waster of Time Staff Member

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    I saw the CT one on sale recently and seriously thought about it. Then I starting reading about duty cycles and its stats weren't great. I suspect I was being too picky though. Dumb question but is the gearbox meant to be powered by a simple pulley on the end with a belt?
     
  8. Eric Fisher

    Eric Fisher Active Member

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    So a geared motor of any quality at all is going to cost you 3 or 4 hundred dollars. DC motor/controller setups are capable of 100:1 turn-down and still provide full torque. Again you are likely looking at $400+ for a proper setup. I suspect Tormek are using a purpose built motor to provide the 100 RPM. That CT option could worth a look...
     
  9. Jester4t7

    Jester4t7 New Member

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    The gearboxes I'm familiar with mount directly to the motor.
     
  10. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    I was just thinking of this this afternoon. My belt grinder goes down to zero fpm LOL but not everyone has one.

    The search is on and the solution may be a belt sander salvaged for the wheels and platen then hook up a reduced speed electric motor or air wrench drive.

    commercial sewing machines can be air driven but the motor and controller are $400 plus range so that is out. I have a variable speed burnisher that could be set up with home made wheels to go with the sanding drums but again $500 range.

    Seems to be a theme here, even the tormek are $400 to $800

    There is the option of a belt grinder and diamond belts and last I saw that was in the ball park of $100 each USD
    http://www.eastwinddiamondabrasives...sin-bonded-belt/Resin-Bond-Diamond-Belts.html

    make the closer to $150
    https://arrowheadlapidarysupply.com/products/2-x-70-resin-diamond-belts-by-eastwind/5562/c104/
     
  11. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    I was working on an idea for a small bicycle frame belt grinder, very odd maybe but part of it was a two belt size arrangement.
     
  12. Jester4t7

    Jester4t7 New Member

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    You know, speaking of bicycles,.....
    You could kick it old school, and power it yourself. You want slow speed and decent torque, some old sprockets from a mountain bike might fit the bill. Or maybe do it like the old foot powered singer sewing machine.
     
    John Noon likes this.

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