1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Selling At A Gun Show Question

Discussion in 'Knife Shows & Events' started by PeterP, Feb 16, 2016.

  1. PeterP

    PeterP Active Member

    Likes Received:
    264
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Hey guys, there is a few gun shows coming up in my neck of the woods and I'm considering selling.
    but since its my first I don't know if its better to just have some sample knives on display or to have a inventory on site to sell, or both?
    If I need a inventory how much knives would be a good number?
    and for display how many knives should I bring?
    any input would help
    Cheers
     
  2. Icho-

    Icho- Staff Member

    Likes Received:
    152
    Trophy Points:
    63
    I had a table at a gun show a couple years ago. I did sell a couple knives. The table was free so I had nothing to loose accept a Sunday but it was relaxing and more importantly I got lots of input from people other than friends and family. As for knives to bring...don't rush for quantity. Bring what you can but make sure what you have on your table is the best work you can do. Go for the experience and if you sell a knife or two consider it a bonus. The show I was at was more of a military garage sale and 99% of the people there were not interested in anything custom, hand made or even higher end.

    All said... go for it, have fun, get input from people you don't know. I will do it again depending on the timing of the next show in my area.
     
    dancom likes this.
  3. Grayzer86

    Grayzer86 Active Member

    Likes Received:
    139
    Trophy Points:
    43
    I would say that you should take as many knives as possible but only if they are the best you can make. Throwing two poorer finished knives on the table with 5 better ones brings the whole table image down. I would also shy away from taking anything that is crazy looking or fantasy styled as it gives the image that you may not be serious about the knives you make. Shows can be great, but only if the product is truly ready to sell. If a bunch of people see a substandard product too early, it may damage your image in the long run. I would also make sure every knife is functionally perfect as far as edge and heat treat. I have always felt that if someone buys a great knife, they may tell 5 people. If they buy a knife that sucks in the end, they are going to tell 50 people. In the end you have to weigh it out and see what the +/- is. The knives people see are the knives that will be associated with your name, so you have to make sure it's a positive image. I skipped a few shows before I had my finish improved, because I did not want to have a widespread image for knives that had flaws. I'm not saying that's an issue for you, just saying that you always have to look at the long term image created from anything you put on public display
     
    dancom likes this.
  4. poppa bear

    poppa bear Member

    Likes Received:
    21
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Good suggestions I was wondering the same
     
  5. PeterP

    PeterP Active Member

    Likes Received:
    264
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Here is the up to date list of the Gun shows in Ontario

    http://ontariogunshows.com/

    I know there is others around, that might be cheaper or better don't know, I know that these guys ask for like $20.00 for a table.
    and they only have limited room for knife makers.
     
  6. Brad

    Brad Active Member

    Likes Received:
    83
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Out east gun shows are like a flee market. Great if your looking for a wore out 303 Lee Enfield but not much for knives. I have sold a couple at them but I also picked up some damage too. Go and have fun but try not to expect too much.
     
  7. PeterP

    PeterP Active Member

    Likes Received:
    264
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Personally for me its not so much about selling...its more about getting feedback, the personal interaction. I just think that exposing your work to the general public even if they are not there strictly for knives is still part of the experience needed to perfect our art and skills. A knife maker that listens to all that passes by, stops and looks at your pieces, can profit from the experience. Not from just the ones that actually talk to you, but also from the ones that talk among themselves about your creations. If you sell a knife or two to pay for your day, then great...if not 20.00 bucks is a cheap price to pay to gain more knowledge.
    My two cent.
     

Share This Page