1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Scale attachment?

Discussion in 'Steel, Hardware, & Handle Material' started by GD1911, Mar 3, 2015.

?

What attachment method do you think would be best?

  1. O1 Drill Rod Pins w Epoxy

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. Nickel Silver Pins w Epoxy

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. Nickel Silver Corbys w Epoxy

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  4. Removable Scales w Hex Screws

    100.0%
  1. GD1911

    GD1911 New Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Hey guys,

    I'm in the process of planning out and sourcing materials for my first couple knives but am having an issue deciding on what method to use to attach the scales. The profile I'm using is based on the ESEE6 in O1 tool with G10 scales, so it's a fairly big knife and meant for some pretty hard use (but not abuse I guess).

    My original plan was to use O1 drill rod for pins but thought that might be a bit of a pain trying to contour the handles as I was thinking about trying an 'Anso' pattern on the G10. I then thought about nickel silver pins as I understand that's much softer. BUT, given the indented use maybe a nickel silver Corby would be best suited...OR do removable scales with domed hex screws and a threaded sleeve...

    As you can see I'm lost...Anyone out there more experienced have any recommendations or advice?

    Keep in mind I'm a Noob :(

    Cheers:beer:
     
  2. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

    Likes Received:
    989
    Trophy Points:
    113
    My $0.02

    For that particular style of knife, my choice would be removable scales. I'd go with a Torx or hex socket machine screw and a threaded standoff at the tang. I think these are sold as "JP bolts", but you could source the individual parts and assemble your own.

    For a permanent scale attachment I use 416 stainless and a very good epoxy. 416 machines easily and won't rust.
    Others like Loveless or Corbys which offer more mechanical holding power to aid the epoxy. Whatever hardware you use, with good epoxy and good surface prep, these are going to be a bitch to take off.

    Dan
     
  3. GD1911

    GD1911 New Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Hey Dan,

    Yeah, I noticed the majority of 'bigger' camp knives seem to have removable scales but i never really understood why? is it for cleaning or just customization? in any case that seems like the easiest for me in that I don't have to peen or grind down anything (doing this by hand unfortunately)

    P.S. I'm going to take a crack at your KN9 chefs knife next I think.

    Anyone have any other suggestions
     
  4. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

    Likes Received:
    989
    Trophy Points:
    113
    That's a good question.

    It sure would make it easy to polish up a blade if the scales could be taken off. My guess is (as you alluded to) removable scales greatly reduce time to manufacture. Screwing together machined parts seems to me way faster than shaping the handle in-situ.

    Dan
     
  5. Rob W

    Rob W Active Member

    Likes Received:
    57
    Trophy Points:
    48
    GD I'm a noob too but my opinion is if your going big knife big handle hard use I'd be going fixed handle with Corby's or loveless....
    unless of course your plans are to change the handle to something different down the road , if not then imo removable scales are more less pointless.......
    I don't recall ever removing a handle to polish a blade but that doesn't mean it's not a good idea ? :rolleyes:
    That's the nice thing about being your own knife creator , do whatever you like , look forward to seeing whichever route you choose !!
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2015
  6. GD1911

    GD1911 New Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    OK, so here's what might be another silly question...When drilling for corbys do i really need a proper counterbore bit (as i cant seem to find any) or can I get away with regular bits of the proper diameter.
     

Share This Page