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Quench Tank Ideas

Discussion in 'Forges, Ovens, Kilns, & Salt Pots' started by dancom, Oct 19, 2015.

  1. Brad

    Brad Active Member

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    Canola has an extremely high flash point plus everything smells like french fries.
     
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  2. Grizz Axxemann

    Grizz Axxemann Active Member

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    French fries are tasty :p
     
  3. Yamroll

    Yamroll New Member

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    My concern with that is not the flash point, but the smoke point. Canola has a flash point north of 600F but the smoke point is around 450. I'd rather not burn my oil and chud it all up (and the heating element, for that matter).
     
  4. Ta2edfreak

    Ta2edfreak New Member

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    Clean canola will last quite a while without smoking and if you're only running it for an hour or two each time, you can use it a number of times without worry. Water and debris from cooking will lower both flash and smoke point but fresh clean canola, sunflower or safflower oil will be good. Besides, with most plain carbon steel, tempering at 450 will give you a hardness in the low 50s.
     
  5. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Awesome use of the word chud!
     
  6. Yamroll

    Yamroll New Member

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    Not to be contrarian, but my experience with canola has been that repeated exposure to heat reduces the smoke point of subsequent heats. Heating cooking oils at or around there smoke point causes some degree of molecular degradation and produces more free fatty acids, which increases the rate at which the oil can oxidize, and potentially lead to some nasty polymerization around the element.

    That, and my understanding of the different simple SAE alloys is that a temper for 450 will only yield low 50's RHC for your 1040s, 1050s, perhaps 1060s. 1084 and 1095 in particular require higher temps to bring that hardness down.

    Fundamentally, I think you're right that canola is a solid choice for both quenching and oil tempering, it just will require a lot of maintenance and replacement as it burns and what not.
     
  7. Shadnuke

    Shadnuke Disabled dreamer...

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    How about a length of eavestrough? Depending on how deep you need it, what about a length of 3 inch pipe of some sort, just need to weld a cap on to one end. You could always go the ammo box route. I saw a bunch at Princess Auto last time I was in there, and they were cheap, around $20 bucks iirc.
     
  8. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    Saw a concrete form used for parking lot curbs that would work nicely.
     
  9. Ta2edfreak

    Ta2edfreak New Member

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    Of course it will but even restaurants that run fryers constantly at temps around 400, usually only change their oil about once a week. The amount you would be using it wouldnt affect it that much very quickly. I use 1084, 5160, 52100 and O1 and I usually temper my blades at around 400-425.
     
  10. Shadnuke

    Shadnuke Disabled dreamer...

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    As in a wooden box?
     
  11. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    No the form was 1/8" Galvanized steel about four feet long, ended up making the back of a truck cab with it many moons ago.

    Of course if you hit up a structural steel fab shop a 3-4' piece of 6x6 HSS could work. Weld ends shut, cut out one side and use it to make a lid that can be closed in case of fire.
     
  12. Toby Schmid

    Toby Schmid New Member

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    Old topic, but what the hey!
    Has anyone considered using the Mrs' old crock pot to pre heat quench oil?
     
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  13. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    People have used those pots and there is also a heater that is portable.

    I finally picked up a mortar ammo can which will get a heater and circulation pump.
     
  14. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    A friend of mine uses an old coffee urn. I think it must hold about 100 cups. The keep warm element is used to heat the oil.
     
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  15. Shadnuke

    Shadnuke Disabled dreamer...

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    I found an old coffee urn at the Value Village here in town. I tried using it to quench with the heater on, but it didn't shock cool the blade quick enough. I wound up just heating a bolt up, dropping it in, and going that route. I quenched a couple blades, but the steel I have is a tad on the thick side, so my little torch wasn't big enough to get it to a high enough temperature. Now I have a decent burner and will be finishing up my 2 brick forge redesign soon, so hopefully I can save the warped blade I have sitting from last fall!
     

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