1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

My Gas Forge Build

Discussion in 'Forges, Ovens, Kilns, & Salt Pots' started by Daniel P, May 18, 2019.

  1. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

    Likes Received:
    949
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Another option is to use the existing bricks as a form and line the interior with some ceramic wool and refractory cement. These too can be gotten from pottery supply places.
    https://www.psh.ca/index.php?cat_id=160
    https://www.soundingstone.com/collections/firing-accessories
    https://tuckerspotteryeshop.com/index.php/product/bricks-uncut/
    https://www.sial-canada.com/en/wool-brick
    http://plainsmanclays.com/store/index.php?find=brick&pictureflow=1&iframe=0&store=1f5v2j7n4i

    Or you can try what I did. I called a local industrial refractory place and asked if they have any "scraps" of ceramic wool. After I told the guy I was making knives and was building a forge he happily gave me a garbage bag full of 1" ceramic wool, gratis.

    Dan
     
    Daniel P likes this.
  2. Daniel P

    Daniel P New Member

    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    8
    I just did a test with one of the bricks I show in the photo.
    I got my oxy acet torch to a hot flame and held it on a brick for 30secs
    No melting
    I’m not sure if that’s a good enough test
    Anyway.
    I may try them
    If they fail I will try Oakville for brick
    Thanks for the information
    D
     
  3. Mythtaken

    Mythtaken Staff Member CKM Staff

    Likes Received:
    245
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Three burners seems like overkill to me, unless you are planning a very long forge. I think positioning is more important than the number, when it comes to burners. You want to ensure they are off-centre to encourage "cyclonic action" which creates a more even heating inside the forge.

    Also, if you plan on forge welding or making damascus, I would opt for a vertical forge.
     
    Daniel P likes this.
  4. Daniel P

    Daniel P New Member

    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Im on my way to buy new fire bricks soon
    Going with the R26it from Psw
    2-1/2” thick
    And some kind of sealer for the brick joints.
    I think 14 bricks should do it.

    I hoping by adjusting the chokes I can get up to welding temperature.

    I’m going to pick up a pound of packing for around the burner tubes while I’m at the pottery supply

    I hope by the weekend I can get this forge started

    Daniel P

    Appreciate the pointers all!...Thanks
     
  5. FORGE

    FORGE Maker of the Year Best Knife

    Likes Received:
    289
    Trophy Points:
    63
    If you plan on welding in this forge the borax will just EAT those bricks in no time. 14 Bricks is a lot of mass to heat to get up to welding temp.
    Big is not beautiful when it comes to forges , make it no bigger than required for the jobs you plan on forging, unless you own a propane company.
    My big forge with two burners will eat up a 20 lb tank in 3 hours and my little forge with only one burner will run 8-10 hours on a 20 lb tank.
     
  6. Daniel P

    Daniel P New Member

    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    8
    I have new bricks now
    2600
     
  7. Daniel P

    Daniel P New Member

    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    8
    I did get 14 bricks
    There 2-1/2” thick x 9 x 4-1/2”
    2 are for the doors
    And there will be half a brick hanging out at the front
    I’m not sure what the area will be in the forge just yet
    But I’m guessing 350 cubic inches
    Is this too big?
    Now instead of 3 burners I’m planning on just 2 , and I will build it just to run on one burner to save on fuel if I’m just doing knife work.
    If I can’t get forge weld heat out of it
    It’s no big deal
    It will be great for regular blacksmith work.
     
  8. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

    Likes Received:
    949
    Trophy Points:
    113
    You should be able to get to welding temps, for sure with two burners. I've come to know a sort of rule of thumb to be one efficient 3/4" Venturi burner for 300 to 350 cubic inches of interior volume given good insulation. I have two 3/4" burners but rarely use them both. Most of the time I block off the back half of the forge with a fitted K fire brick and use only the front burner. I use harder fire bricks for the floor as they are inexpensive and easy to get at the hardware store.
     
  9. Daniel P

    Daniel P New Member

    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    8
    I had some time today to start working on the gas forge.
    I’m happy that I got the new fire bricks
    https://pin.it/sdu5755urrk7kc

    Area works out to 324 cubic inches

    Going with the 2 burners
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2019
    dancom likes this.
  10. Mythtaken

    Mythtaken Staff Member CKM Staff

    Likes Received:
    245
    Trophy Points:
    63
    So this is going to be a rectangular forge? Those seem to be getting more common, though I don't understand why. I think they are more problematic than cylindrical ones, being more prone to creating hotspots, disrupt the heat flow (corners), and generally have more wasted volume that needs to be heated.

    Does anyone have some numbers that show some advantage rectangular forges bring? I'm curious about this trend.
     
  11. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

    Likes Received:
    582
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Something I have not pursued yet is a ring with burner that can run with a back and front plate or add in another ring with burner section. Creating a modular forge for large projects and use as a small forge or two other times.
     
  12. Daniel P

    Daniel P New Member

    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Yes it’s a rectangle forge
    I figured if I’m heating up a blade
    I will keep a eye on it and move it around in the forge...I’m not concerned about hot spots because of this.
    If I’m just heating and pounding out the iron it should be good too.
    Had no time to work on this forge today
    But I’m sure thinking about it
     
  13. Daniel P

    Daniel P New Member

    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Working on the forge again today.
    Tomorrow I plan to get the reducing couplings drilled out and plumb up the gas pipinghttps://pin.it/sosqieaypzzei3
     
  14. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

    Likes Received:
    949
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Looking like a store bought unit. Good work.
     
  15. Magnus

    Magnus New Member

    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Looks pretty good.

    My forge is also rectangular and I have no complaints. Once the forge is up to temperature I don't really notice any hot spots.
     
  16. Daniel P

    Daniel P New Member

    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    8
    The forge is up and running!
    Had some time to work on it today.
    I’m using 035 mig tips and open ended 1” pipe , I’m not sure if I need anything on the flame end?
    I just have the pipe coming through the bricks about a half inch.
    Anyway I put a piece of 1/2” round in there
    For a test run
    Then hammered it out to a 90
    Working pretty good so far on the 1 burner
    The whole top just sits on there... not welded down or bolted.
    It will be easy to get at the bricks this way.
    Thanks for all the tips guys, I just gathered your help and just started cutting and welding
    No drawing... just winged it
    Daniel
    https://pin.it/xtj2kl4jm2pmj7
     
    John Noon likes this.
  17. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

    Likes Received:
    949
    Trophy Points:
    113
    That's great. Nothing like hearing the engines roar for the first time. :)
     

Share This Page