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My First Knife

Discussion in 'Steel, Hardware, & Handle Material' started by Daniel P, May 14, 2019.

  1. Daniel P

    Daniel P New Member

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  2. Daniel P

    Daniel P New Member

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    Getting a even grin on both sides of the blade is tricky for me.
    I just started on my second knife
    And to get a 1/2” radius curve in the blade
    I may try my die grinder.
    I have been using mild steel for practicing the grind.
    I’m not fully clear on peening the pins
    I ended up sanding the peen off so I guess the epoxy is keeping it together
     
  3. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Daniel,

    Good job on your first knife!

    For scales I use the pins for sheer prevention and epoxy seals and holds the scales on. If you ever have the joy of removing some scales after assembly you'll realize how difficult it is to get them off. I found that I had to drive the pins out and heat the handle to soften the epoxy to get the scales. I use a heat gun for this. For a bolsters I don't use epoxy so I pein them.

    Dan
     
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  4. Griff

    Griff Active Member

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    That is a great first knife! Now you’ve been bitten by the Blade-Bug and infected like the rest of us, we expect more knife pics from you :D
     
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  5. Mythtaken

    Mythtaken Staff Member CKM Staff

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    Great job on your first one! I wish mine had worked out that well.

    Getting an even grind on both sides is something that comes with time; doesn't matter if you do it free-hand or with jigs. It's a mix of experience, "feel", and muscle memory.

    As Dan said, most makers don't peen handle pins, as modern epoxies are pretty good at holding things together. That said, I still like the security of having some mechanical grip at play, so peening or pressing pins is a plus in my book. Even though you ground off the ends, peening expands the diameter of the pins (by compressing the length), which will hold very well.

    You might want to consider adding a choil to your next blade. It makes that transition between the ricasso and blade cleaner.
     
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  6. Daniel P

    Daniel P New Member

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    Thanks guys for your support and tips
    It helps a ton.
    I’m actually loving this slippery slope
    I now have a interest in making a hatchet
    Dan I did read about you suggesting a ball peen hammer to create a hatchet
    Look for me on the gas forge building
    Cheers
    Daniel P
     

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