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Itc-100... Where To Buy?

Discussion in 'Forges, Ovens, Kilns, & Salt Pots' started by Illuminaughty, Mar 3, 2017.

  1. Illuminaughty

    Illuminaughty New Member

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    Simply where can we buy this in Canada?
    I called mor heat in Toronto they don't carry it.
    I called tuckers pottery in Toronto they don't carry it anymore. The rigidizer they have I was told is a different compound than the itc 100.
     
  2. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    Is it the same temperature rating and capable of doing the same job?
     
  3. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    Found the Canadian supplier, searching proper name helps "ITC-100HT High Emissivity Ceramic Coating"

    http://www.norheat.ca/products/

    NorHeaT Treatment Inc. - Waterdown, Ontario, Canada - 905-730-4169
     
  4. Illuminaughty

    Illuminaughty New Member

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    My understanding is that the rigidizer is to provide a protective coating for the ceramic insulation to prevent damage and erosion.
    The itc 100 is thermal reflector. Improving efficiency and providing the ability to achieve higher temperatures.
     
  5. Illuminaughty

    Illuminaughty New Member

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    I just called that guy, Tom Norris, will post when I get a quote.
    Thanks for the lead John!
     
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  6. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    call it luck, someone had a picture of the container and I noticed every time I searched I was using a short form of the description like all knife making sites. once you use the long name the pros use then there are plenty of suppliers.
     
  7. Illuminaughty

    Illuminaughty New Member

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    I was quoted at $130 a pint. Feel like I've seen that number before. Stuff definitely isn't cheap.
     
  8. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    Just paid $130 in taxes and customs for four cans of Condursal. There is nothing cheap in this hobby when everything has to come up from the States, putting serious effort into getting stuff directly from the manufacturers.
    Of course that means trying to figure out where to store 500 Lbs of paper Micarta sheets if I do order it and ten thousand fasteners for Kydex and leather sheaths LMAO
     
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  9. Steve98

    Steve98 New Member

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    Pottery supply house sells it: http://www.psh.ca/index.php?item_id=RCCA2 - $125/500ml. I think its expensive because its made of unicorns.

    Wayne Coe sells an alternative product called Metrikote that some people like, but most people feel isn't quite as good as ITC-100: http://www.waynecoeartistblacksmith.com/Forge_Supplies.html

    ITC-100 is, technically, an IR emitter. For all intents and purposes you can think of it as "reflecting" IR but it's secretly absorbing it and re-emitting it. It's also absorbing heat from conduction/convection and emitting that as IR too. That IR is responsible for a lot (I believe most) of the heat transfer into your work piece. It also happens to be flux resistant.

    You don't absolutely need it. Many people weld in forges that have never seen ITC or a similar coating.
     
  10. Illuminaughty

    Illuminaughty New Member

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    Ya I've been welding in my forge and didn't use it. However after a handful of uses its starting to near the end of its life
     
  11. Steve98

    Steve98 New Member

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    http://www.hightemptools.com/refractorycoatings.html
    Because flux is erroding the liner? Or because of other reasons?

    Bubble alumina is another option for a flux resistant floor: http://www.hightemptools.com/refractorycoatings.html

    Using high-alumina kiln tile as a floor will also help (and provide mechanical protection to the floor).
     
  12. Griff

    Griff Active Member

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  13. Steve98

    Steve98 New Member

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    No, that's different. While it's probably possible to use ITC-100 as a refractory coating on kaowool, most people don't. It's generally used as a coating *on top of* a refractory coating (i.e., if you used that Kiln Cement, you'd coat ITC-100 on top of it).

    You only need a thin layer to provide flux resistance and improved IR emission compared to other forge interior coatings. It really is a specialty thing, and lots of alternatives etc have been investigated with the general conclusion is that ITC-100 is better than anything else.

    I have no direct experience with it.
     
  14. Mythtaken

    Mythtaken Staff Member CKM Staff

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    The best flux resistance is not to use any. Turn down the air, turn up the heat, and weld away.
     
  15. Voice of William's Hammer

    Voice of William's Hammer New Member

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    If you are looking for ITC-100 (or rigidizer) Canadian Forge & Farrier sells it at a fair price of $89 cdn.
    https://canadianforge.com/products/itc-100ht-ceramic-forge-coating.

    I've found it takes a bit more finesse applying ITC to kaowool than to brick or castable, but it works well. Its less like painting kleenex if you apply rigidizer first to give the kaowool a firmer structure, then dampen the kaowool slightly, use a pencil and push some 'divots' in the wool so the ITC will make mechanical 'roots', and paint it on with a shortened stiff brush.

    It takes less time to reach welding heat using the ITC, and your refractories last longer. It is rated to 5000 degrees F, which is off the charts.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2019
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  16. Zoltan

    Zoltan New Member

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    I ordered some ITC 100 from Canadian Forge and Farrier as well. It shipped next day and arrived 2 days later, and now my forge is quite a bit hotter, in a lot less time. Sean was great to deal with as well, and as they are a new store, he was asking for suggestions of supplies to bring in for knifemaking. Great service all around.
     
  17. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Awesome to hear. Thanks Aaron.
     

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