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Heat Treating equipment

Discussion in 'Heat Treating' started by r-ice, Jul 2, 2013.

  1. r-ice

    r-ice New Member

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    Hi, was wondering what everyone did for heat treating? Whats the best oven to get in Canada or should I take a quick drive down to the states? Do you guys send out or do it yourself?
     
  2. Grayzer86

    Grayzer86 Active Member

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    I usually sent mine out until I got a forge. Now I HT my own 1084, but still send out my stainless and 5160 to knifemaker.ca. An oven is on the list when I have the cash for sure though.
     
  3. Mythtaken

    Mythtaken Staff Member CKM Staff

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    Many of the common carbon steels you can heat treat yourself in a small forge (even the trusty two-brick one). For anything else, it's a toss-up between the Evenheat and the Paragon ovens. Evenheats seem more readily available in Canada. Do some price checking and see where you can get the best deal.

    BTW, I do my own HT of carbon steel (1084, O1) and plan on an Evenheat in the near future (i.e. when I can figure out where the heck to put it in my already overcrowded space).
     
  4. Brad

    Brad Active Member

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    I'm not expert by any means but you can get pretty good results with a forge or torch on simple carbon steel. I now have a oven (Evenheat from Rob at Canadian knife making supplies). I tested some of the knives I heat treated with a forge and torch to destruction just to be sure of my results. I'm more complacent with the oven but I still do the brass rod test on my blades. The oven is great for getting a nice even heat (Very lousy pun) on your blade without worrying about getting hot spots.
     
  5. stevebates

    stevebates Active Member

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    I have an Evenheat and Rob i think has a Paragon both do an excellent job (no complaints here) and its AMAZING how fast you pay them off. I bought mine about 2 months ago and heat treated enough blades that I can truly say its paid for :)
     
  6. FORGE

    FORGE Maker of the Year Best Knife

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    Salt is the only way to heat treat.
    It is cheap and most knife makers can make a salt pot.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Rob W

    Rob W Active Member

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    here's a good read
    google "kevin cashen all about salt baths" and scroll down 5 or 6 links to the title "all about salt baths" read them all , goes into great detail of the pros and cons

    I'd like to have one some day even if its just to try, but for now my Paragon suits my needs perfectly
     
  8. Icho-

    Icho- Staff Member

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    The salt really got my attention. I think I will look into it a little more. That was very interesting Rob.
     
  9. Grayzer86

    Grayzer86 Active Member

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    After watching the salt heat treating demo at the Regina hammer in I agree that it is probably the best way to go. The temp control combined with how clean the blades came out of it was what really impressed me. Add to hat the fact that the blades hang vertically without touching anything and you also eliminate possible pressure warping or temp variances. I would love to do my blades that way but I doubt my fabricating skills on something like that. Now if only someone who had made one before made some to sell........ Lol.
     
  10. r-ice

    r-ice New Member

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    does anyone in ontario run salt pot around here that I could come check it out?
     
  11. metal99

    metal99 Member

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    Can you do stainless in salt pots?
     
  12. Jim T

    Jim T Active Member

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    Yep. When I took my first knife making lesson from Ed Storch (in Manville, Alberta) I made a blade from ATS-34 stainless steel and Ed used molten salt to heat treat it.

    Jim T
     
  13. Grayzer86

    Grayzer86 Active Member

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    We did a batch of blades at the hammer in and i am pretty sure they were either ATS34 or 440C
     
  14. Rob W

    Rob W Active Member

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    ............and I think that would be the nice thing about a pot..........is volume, lots of knives at once, seems like it may be a lot of work though for 1 or 2 at a time
     
  15. doublehelix1

    doublehelix1 New Member

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    Anyone know where to get refractory brick in regina, SK?
     
  16. Grayzer86

    Grayzer86 Active Member

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    You could try IXL in Regina.
     
  17. r-ice

    r-ice New Member

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    why couldn't any of you with salt pots be in Toronto.....
     
  18. Rob W

    Rob W Active Member

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    never know there may be one near by........i only know of one user in canada, another maker right here in my home town sold his about a year ago, he was in a gated community with a small back yard with close neighbors...........he traded it for elk racks !!! Doh !!!! Missed on that one !!
     
  19. r-ice

    r-ice New Member

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    right now I am thinking of either building or buying a small gas forge so i can heat treat o1 and some of the other 10xx steels at home.

    something like this might work

    http://boingboing.net/2010/04/30/how-to-make-a-miniat.html


     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2013
  20. Mythtaken

    Mythtaken Staff Member CKM Staff

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    That's awfully small for blades and seems overly complicated. If you want a similar one that's easy to make, try the two-brick forge. It gives you a bigger chamber for the heat. Also, if you want to make it longer you can add two more bricks, and even add a larger burner for more heat. I've been using one for years.
     

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