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Diy Small Wheels

Discussion in 'Grinders' started by Bluefish, Apr 27, 2018.

  1. Bluefish

    Bluefish New Member

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    Has anyone made small wheels for their grinder we success? I try and build what I can even is I can buy it, the journey is a big part of the fun. I've recently tried to pour some out of Scotchcast by 3m but that was a failure due to heat.

    I'm thinking Hockey pucks now, they measure in at 90 durometer so they are hard enough. Any ideas or experience would be great.

    Cheers
     
  2. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Do you have a decent lathe? Lots of guys make wheels from cast aluminum, Delron, nylon etc. The only DIY wheels I have made were MDF.
    I've always wanted to cast my own aluminum wheels from old beer cans. There's a story to tell people.
     
  3. Bluefish

    Bluefish New Member

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    yes, pretty much have a full machine shop I can get access too, I have no problem making steel wheels but wouldn't a soft compound be of more benefit?
     
  4. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Yes, if you are using them as contact wheels then the softer surface is more friendly. Some folks call small wheels the idlers on a flat platen setup, in which case aluminum is good, while others call small wheels the small diameter contact wheels that fit into a holder. I have made the latter set with rubber sanding drums, axle and bearings. I also have a steel set from Oregon Blade Maker. The rubber is better for light belts like J weight, whereas the steel ones are fine with heavier backed belts. The seam slap with J weight belts on steel wheels is pretty clacky.
     
  5. Bluefish

    Bluefish New Member

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    sorry for the muddy post, yes I was referring to contact wheels. I've got a bunch of shafts and bearing, holder is pretty much done but is useable as is. Just need something to cover them with and turn to whatever diameter I need. Has anyone tried Hockey pucks? will look into the sanding drums uf I can't find anything else I have around to work.
     
  6. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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  7. Bluefish

    Bluefish New Member

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    Something to look into for sure, will try a few different materials and report my findings.
     
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  8. IamSteve-O

    IamSteve-O New Member

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    I use heavy duty greasable caster wheels. They have a nylon plastic coating over the cast aluminum wheels
     
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  9. Bluefish

    Bluefish New Member

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    Got a couple wheels roughed out but haven't got the posting pics figured out yet.
     
  10. ToddR

    ToddR Putterer, Tinkerer, Waster of Time Staff Member

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    I agree with you about the journey being part of the fun. Strangely, i think i actually enjoy learning the science and metallurgy of knife making and the making of the tools as much as actually making knives. I taught myself to weld in order to make my first grinder. How to make jigs and then improve on them as you use them is extremely gratifying. I am always super impressed with the ingenuity and resourcefulness of people who like to woodwork and metal work. Now finding so many people willing to share that knowledge on this forum - nothing short of amazing. Not taking anything away from those with fully equipped shops and know how to use those tools, they are true craftsmen and artists. But i have a lot of admiration for those who make something incredible out of nothing at all really. And those who overcome complex problems with clever jigs or ideas. I used to subscribe to a lot of woodworking magazines and the "tips and tricks" section was always my favorite. That's where you really got to see the creativity, knowledge and experience of the old timers and the artists. I once made some wheels out of MDF but they weren't trued up very well. I needed to chuck them in a drill press or lathe to round them out and, at the time, i had neither.
     

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