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Dan's K I T H Work

Discussion in '2017 KITH' started by dancom, Apr 6, 2017.

  1. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Not sure if this is the one, but I was doodling around last night and came up with this, kind of a kiritsuke paring knife. Sporting a 4" blade and made of 0.07" AEB-L.

    [​IMG]
     
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  2. Kevin MacPherson

    Kevin MacPherson Member

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    Dan,
    If you don't use that one can I? LOL. Looks great.
     
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  3. Kevin Cox

    Kevin Cox KC knives

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    That look like a great paring knife.
     
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  4. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    If you want to grab the PDF and add your own style to it, it's here:


    [​IMG]


    Not available to the general public as of yet. ;)

    Dan
     
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  5. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Got a little more done last night. I got to the heat treatment part. Actually doing three knives all in AEB-L.

    After buffing the whole knife with green Scotch Brite and wiping with acetone I tied little piece of steel wire through the rear hole so I can hang it. I dunk and brush the blade with Condursal Z1100 which is an anti-scaling compound. The compound prevents decarburization of the steel at high temperatures. The apparatus I made for hanging the blade allows the excess to drip back into the can.
    [​IMG]

    I clipped the hanging wire off. This is what the coating of Condursal looks like after it is dry.
    [​IMG]
    Once the oven is up to 850°, I opened the door and slipped the knife into the furniture. My "furniture" is a soft fire brick with some grooves cut in it. It takes a a few minutes for the oven to recover from the door being opened. I call this my stabilize phase. I use this datasheet for AEB-L. http://smt.sandvik.com/en/materials-center/material-datasheets/strip-steel/sandvik-13c26/?pdf=1
    Although the datasheet is technically 13C26, I understand the composition of 13C26 is very similar to AEB-L. I hold at 1060°C for 10 minutes.

    [​IMG]

    This is out of the oven (and some time to find the camera and turn it on).
    [​IMG]

    On the assembly bench I earlier prepared two copper plates. The hot blade gets slipped between the plates. This blade is so thin it cooled in seconds. I would normally oil quench, but this is 1/16" stock and anything to lessen the chances of warping are encouraged.
    [​IMG]

    Voila! You can see how the Condursal protects the steel's surface.
    [​IMG]

    Along with the other blades, I get them ASAP into the tempering oven at 185°C for two hours. Cool to room temperature and ramp it up for another two hours.
    [​IMG]

    Should be able to start on bevels soon.

    Dan
     
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  6. Grahamm

    Grahamm Active Member

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    Oh man, I feel like I'm falling behind. I haven't gone any further than draw out the shape. Guess I had better get my butt in gear.
     
  7. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    No rush.

    I just happened to be doing a heat treatment. I usually do one knife at a time, but heat treatment makes sense to do three or four at once.

    Dan
     
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  8. Icho-

    Icho- Staff Member

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    Lookin good Dan. I like that you went with a thin blade.
     
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  9. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Form follows function. ;)
     
  10. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Out of the oven...into the belts

    I started making the pointy end pointy on the flat platen with a 60 ceramic belt moving at around 3800 to 4000 SFM. I'd recommend a dunk every pass and don't stay in one spot. Keep the blade moving. You do not want friction to make a temperature in the steel that goes past the tempering temperature, in this case 185°C.
    [​IMG]

    About every three or four moves across the belt when tapering, I'll do run in-line. This sort of balances out any high and low spots and makes the pointy end go pointy.
    [​IMG]

    When grinding, I am always using the back-light fluorescent to check the lines.
    [​IMG]

    Now up to 120 ceramic and checking the flow each pass. Here I am checking the handle to blade transition zone. It's not a plunge line, it's a beginner's slope. The slope must start ahead of the front of the handle or scales. If the steel slopes under the scales, the scales will not always bend to the curve the way you want them to.
    [​IMG]

    Here is the cutting edge. The goal is to bring the primary bevel to 15 to 20 thousandths (0.015 to 0.02) of an inch and set the cutting edge from there.
    [​IMG]

    I keep checking with a caliper along thin side of the primary bevel as I am grinding. The point areas are 15 thou., the belly is 18 thou. and the heel area is more around 20 thousandths.
    [​IMG]

    ----------------------------------------------------
    Saw this 3M purple sandpaper at Walmart. I thought I'd give it a try. This is P180. The backing is "waxy". I guess that's a good way to describe it. It's pretty tough, washes nicely with water and doesn't clog very easily with hardened steel. Overall...better than cheap sandpaper. Not perfect, but because the backing holds up and the abrasive stands up to hardened steel, yes, worth the extra money.
    [​IMG]

    In the hand sanding mode, the Pro Grade P180 makes a good finish. I don't know what 3M is using with this product, but it feels like a ceramic coating.
    [​IMG]

    For the finish to really pop, I run the conditioning belt at fast speeds and lightly contact the blade to the bottom wheel on the flat platen.
    [​IMG]

    Go fast and polish my son.
    [​IMG]
    The steel is not going different colors here, it's a reflection.

    OK, more work to do. Thanks for looking!

    Dan
     
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  11. Grahamm

    Grahamm Active Member

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    Looking great. Can't wait to see the finished product.
     
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  12. Grahamm

    Grahamm Active Member

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    Looking great. Can't wait to see the finished product.
     
  13. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    All things handled...

    Before starting on the handle I like to tape up the blade with 3M 233 masking tape.

    [​IMG]

    I've had a couple of maple burl scales that have been stabilized with Stick Fast sitting idle for a few years. Time to put them to use. They are a bit on the thick side for a paring knife, but we'll work them into a nimble handle.
    [​IMG]

    Checking the bookmatch pattern I traced them and cut them out on the band saw.
    [​IMG]

    I used some 3/16" wooden dowel to temporarily pin the scales to the tang. This helps keep everything lined up during drilling.
    [​IMG]

    Viewing the top the grain moves across the handle. I have a feeling this is going to look very good.
    [​IMG]

    I traced and cut out two spacers to go between the steel and the wood. It gives a nice line and helps buffer the area between hard steel and softer wood.
    [​IMG]

    I took everything and pinned with dowels to shape the fronts.
    [​IMG]

    With everything in place I cut the front close to the final shape with the band saw.
    [​IMG]

    Then sanded in slack belt mode.
    [​IMG]

    And buffed on the clean wheel.
    [​IMG]

    I cut some 3/16" 304 stainless rod for pins. Chamfered the ends a bit and scuffed them with 150 grit sand paper.
    [​IMG]

    Everything is ready to clean.
    [​IMG]

    After washing with acetone and prepping the glue up zone, I mixed about two teaspoons of G-flex. This should be more than enough to coat all the surfaces, pins and holes.
    [​IMG]


    Starting with one side and coating the pins and holes, spread a thin coat. Then coat the spacer and sandwich together.
    [​IMG]

    Repeat the layers coating each surface. More is better here than less.
    [​IMG]

    Everything is pinned, wipe the excess and clamp with low force about 10 to 20 lbs.
    [​IMG]

    After clamping up, wipe the excess epoxy off and check around the fronts of the scales. It's much easier and cleaner to wipe off epoxy now than it is to be scraping it off tomorrow.
    [​IMG]

    Next stop is the fun part of shaping the handle.

    More coming soon...
     
  14. Grahamm

    Grahamm Active Member

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    Wow. I sure hope you don't end up with mine. It's gonna be a pretty lopsided exchange.
    That looks awesome.
     
  15. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    I will be happy with whatever I get. People probably laughed at Picasso when he first started out. The folks that have is earliest works are the ones laughing all the way to the bank today.

    Do your best and have fun and learn from the process. ;)

    Dan
     
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  16. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Handle shaping...

    The next day I went on to flattening and squaring the surfaces. There's a lot of material to remove, so I started with a 60 grit and used the work rest to get things as close to 90° as possible.
    [​IMG]

    I remove all the wood and spacer until the belt just kisses the steel. Not too much into the steel as we don't want to change the handle shape.
    [​IMG]

    We also need to be aware of pin burn. That is when the friction of grinding the pin causes heat to build up and burn the surrounding epoxy and wood. Pin burn appears as a black ring around the pin.
    [​IMG]

    Once it's flat all around I start knocking off the corners at 45°. I went to a 120 grit belt for this.
    [​IMG]



    This is one facet along the handle line. Be extremely careful when approaching the blade so as not to clip the blade with the belt.
    [​IMG]

    After the work rest I go to the slack belt. Starting at 220 grit, rotate the handle while making light contact with the belt. Note the belt speed here is important for making a smooth, polished finish. Control the pressure and keep moving.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    On the bench I wet sand 'freestyle' with 600, 800 and 1000 grit sheet.
    [​IMG]

    For the final touch I buff with some PlastX. Yes, this is a plastic polish, but the stabilized wood is essentially plastic. Applying oil at this stage doesn't make sense as the oil won't penetrate stabilized wood.
    [​IMG]

    After taking the tape off we can work on any excess epoxy around the fronts of the scales. Here a brass rod shaped to a V point works great. Soften the material by applying a little acetone with an artist's brush.
    [​IMG]

    Work in the same direction as the blade. The brass is softer than the steel and doesn't scratch.
    [​IMG]

    The final step is to put an edge on it. I like to use the slack belt slowed down a bit and away from the cutting edge.
    [​IMG]

    A 320 grit belt will put a wire edge on. After the wire edge, a few seconds on the power stop and it's sharp enough for kitchen use for sure.
    [​IMG]

    Thanks for looking!

    Dan
     
  17. Kevin MacPherson

    Kevin MacPherson Member

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    Very nice Dan. Thanks for sharing.
     
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  18. SDMay

    SDMay Active Member

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    Another well done project with lots of info. Thanks Dan!
     
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  19. Grahamm

    Grahamm Active Member

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    Great point about the stabilized wood. I never would have thought of that. Who knows how much oil I would have put on and wipe off over and over.
    Thanks and nice knife.
     
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  20. cuatroXcuatro

    cuatroXcuatro Active Member

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    What is the conditioning belt you are using? I bought a collection of belts from knifemaker.ca and don't know which ones to use or when yet.
     

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