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Damascus

Discussion in 'Working the Steel' started by Illuminaughty, Mar 6, 2017.

  1. Illuminaughty

    Illuminaughty New Member

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    Anyone here forge weld their own pattern layered steel bullets? (Damascus)
    How'd it go?

    Any comments questions tips tricks.

    Anyone ever try welding stainless steel (say from a salvaged s.s. sink) and carbon steel (like 1080)?

    Once I'm done building the forge I wanna try this :3
     
  2. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Lumi,

    Quite a few guys in the group make their own pattern welded billets. If you look around you'll see some of Cal's (FORGE)'s amazing work. (Just one of his many inspriring posts - http://www.canadianknifemaker.ca/index.php?threads/feather-damascus.2466/)

    Although I am no expert, I'd start with something that's been successfully done before, say 1084/15n20.

    Even a san mai with 15n20 clad 1084 core can be very impressive when etched.

    Dan
     
  3. Illuminaughty

    Illuminaughty New Member

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    I had to order the 1095. CKM supply has no 1084 atm. Gonna try A San Mai.
     
  4. Mythtaken

    Mythtaken Staff Member CKM Staff

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    I'm with Dan on that. I wouldn't expect much from the sink steel. No telling what's in it or if it will even forge weld properly -- not a good idea when you're starting out.

    Good luck with the San Mai. I hope you'll record your progress to share.
     
  5. Illuminaughty

    Illuminaughty New Member

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    I order some 15n20 which arrived yesterday and just ordered some 1075 and 1095 from mcmaster-Carr. So I'll be starting with a known successful combination.
     
  6. Illuminaughty

    Illuminaughty New Member

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    So my first piece I did get some inclusions minor delamination and it curved on the quench. I fluted with borax worked in one direction to force the flux our and set the welds the delamination happened when I tried to upset the piece and I quenched in used motor oil.
    Any idea how to avoid these problems? Any suggestions would be great.
     
  7. Mythtaken

    Mythtaken Staff Member CKM Staff

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    Just a few thoughts that might help.
    Make sure you've got your steel clean to start with.
    Take your time with heating to ensure you maintain a good even welding heat throughout the steel, and don't let it get too cool when you're working it.

    As for curving, did you quench right after forging it? There's a lot of stress in the steel after all that pounding. You might try letting it cool on it's own first to reduce the stress, then reheat and quench.

    For your quench, please make sure you have plenty of ventilation and are wearing an appropriate mask. Used motor oil works, but it can also contain all manner of toxic stuff.
     
  8. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    Doing some research on vapor quenching and warm to hot water quenching and water above 70F-100F up to the boiling point can cool at the same rate as fast or medium speed oils. Much safer than mystery oils and temperature controls speed so you can tailor the bath to the steel.
    Will post up more as I get more solid numbers
     
  9. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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