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It's A Hazy, Smokey Micarta Making Saturday!

Discussion in 'Materials & Technique' started by ConnorBC, Jul 8, 2017.

  1. ConnorBC

    ConnorBC Active Member

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    With fires burning all around our area, it s a stay in type of day. Time to catch up and restock my Micarta supply. Hi-vis blue and hi-vis orange linen spacers, denim and canvas stock. Made 5 new presses (my old presses are over 6 years old) yesterday and it's time to break them in. :)

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  2. Griff

    Griff Member

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    Looking good! I will strive to make a single press as good as your multiples there! I had success with parchment covered mdf as it inheritantly smooth and flat..what are you using?
     
  3. ConnorBC

    ConnorBC Active Member

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    1" MDF backed with 1/4"x3" flat stock. :) I was going to use the MDF to make a Kydex press, but have since talked my son into making a supply of Mokume gane for me. I decided the Kydex press might be a distraction for him, so I replaced my old presses! :roflmao
     
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  4. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    The sky is starting to take on an orange hazy glow here as well. Be safe.

    Are you using epoxy or polyester resin?

    Dan
     
  5. Griff

    Griff Member

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    Dan I was reading somewhere that epoxy works better? It may have even have been you! You can get a very clear epoxy, where as the polyester resin always had a tinge to it. As nice as my Red-White handles came out, I can tell both colours would have popped more if the automotive resin was more clear.

    And by-the-way Connor I am very imPRESSed! :D I also now know how to build a proper one, thanks!
     
  6. ConnorBC

    ConnorBC Active Member

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    We had smoke and ash here all day. Started clearing a little this evening. Hopefully they can get the fires under control shortly.

    We have a great supplier in Kamloops for Fibreglass and carbon fibre supplies. I use marine grade (slight blue tinge) resin on all of my light colour Micarta and liners like white and light grey, and regular automotive grade (green tinge) resin on the darker colours. I've used automotive resin on the white paper micarta liners and white linen liners and the darker tinge of the resin had no negative effect on colour with the thinner layup of the liners. I use the marine grade only as a precaution and we have a supplier nearby.

    I have not yet used epoxy for scales but I plan to try it this Fall. I really like the effect of the alumilite.
     
  7. ToddR

    ToddR Active Member

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    Connor, Dan, Griff - i have a queston about the materials that go into making your own micarta. I see that most use linen or denim etc. But I also see paper being used. Is it necessary to include some kind of cloth when making micarta for strength or could you make something entirely out of paper. Also, what kind of paper is best? Should it be heavier stock or does the strength come from the resin/epoxy anyway.

    I was thinking about moving on from making all wood handles to something a little different, and more colourful.

    Thanks guys.
     
  8. ConnorBC

    ConnorBC Active Member

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    Good morning! :)

    I used to make a lot of paper Micarta. I've never added and material to my paper Micarta, it was all from just paper. You'd be amazed at just how hard paper Micarta cures up. I've always used the coloured printer paper you can get from Staples or Office Max. I haven't made paper Micarta from heavier card stock, so I'm not sure how well that would work. I see a lot of guys using the coloured construction paper the kids use in school projects etc, with good results. Hope this helps?
     
  9. ToddR

    ToddR Active Member

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    This is what i was hoping you'd say. That opens the door to a lot of different colours. It's affordable too. Would the automotive resin change the colour dramatically? Or should i just use epoxy. I'd like to make some brilliant colours i think. Something easy to see like orange/yellow. I don't mind it being a bit watered down but i don't want to end up with something muddy looking.

    Thanks again, I'm a bit of an obsessive researcher.
     
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  10. ConnorBC

    ConnorBC Active Member

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    I don't think there is such a thing as obsessive research is there?! :D lol I'm the same way!

    I also like the brighter colours like reds, orange, blues... I use good ol' Bondo brand resin for colours and marine grade resin on whites and light greys. I find that paper is a more likely to look muddy on the lighter colours if you don't use the marine grade
     
  11. ConnorBC

    ConnorBC Active Member

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    I don't think there is such a thing as obsessive research is there?! :D lol I'm the same way!

    I also like the brighter colours like reds, orange, blues... I use good ol' Bondo brand resin for colours and marine grade resin on whites and light greys. I find that paper is a more likely to look muddy on the lighter colours if you don't use the marine grade. The darker colours make no difference whatsoever with the automotive grade resins once you start grinding into it. The colours are just as vibrant as the dry material you started with. Denim, linen, canvas... I've found no difference at all when using automotive resins either.
     

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