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Heat Treat Question

Discussion in 'Heat Treating' started by krash-bang, Jun 8, 2016.

  1. Griff

    Griff Active Member

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    @dancom thanks for finding that it was a good read.

    So after reading that I think I will go for option ‘B,’ with my knives, and put them in the kiln and push he start button to climb to Equalizing temp.

    Anyone want to talk about ‘Normalizing,’ now :p

    :beer:
     
  2. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    One thing I just thought of by placing the blade in furnace at a preheat step it will spend less time at a temperature range the steel may be crack sensitive
     
  3. John Noon

    John Noon Well-Known Member

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    If steel is of the air hardening type there is no normalizing schedule, there may be an annealing schedule and it can take days
     
  4. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    I use Condursal as a stop off and it has a specific temperature range say 800 to 1100°C. I heat the oven to around 800, then stick the blades in. I have tried starting from scratch (< 800°C) with Condursal and I found it really hard to remove after.

    Normalization: Heat to Austenitizing temp then cool past the knee slower than quench speeds. Repeat a couple or three times to relieve stress and refine the grain structure. Great for plain carbon steel, but doesn't work for air hardened steel that I use.
     
  5. Griff

    Griff Active Member

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    Yeah I am diving in deep head first with the steels I have and my new kiln. I have Aldo’s W2, some Cruforge V and AEB-L coming from AKS, and I have a VG-10 core billet with stainless jacket, and a bunch of 01! The thing is going to get a work out. I am desperately reading as much as I can to not make too many failures. I understand anything can happen in the HT process, but the steel I mentioned isn’t cheap, and I would be lying if I didn’t admit that I am a tad apprehensive :poop lol!

    I plan on normalizing the W2 three times at varying temps, before going through with the final HT at 1450-1460F ‘ish (787c- 793c) for a ten min soak as per Don Hanson’s recommendation and then temper 2hr x 2 at 425F (218c) each cycle, shooting for 63-64HRC. Aparently Aldo’s W2 is based on an analysis of Don Hanson’s W2 and so far all research has pointed to treating it as such.

    Notice there’s no mention of ‘Equalizing,’ in this W2 process lol
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2019
  6. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    The nice thing about steel is that if you blow the heat treat you can always do it again. I had a solid state relay do a melt down as my oven was closing in on 1000°C and three blades were in there. I fixed the machine and ran them all again the next day. All good.
     
  7. Griff

    Griff Active Member

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    Well you are right about that @dancom
     
  8. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    (Not like a $40 block of stabilized wood that you mess up.):(
     

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