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First Sharpening

Discussion in 'Sharpening' started by ToddR, May 29, 2017.

  1. ToddR

    ToddR Active Member

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    Hi guys. I'm looking for advice or suggestions. I have about 6 new knives that i need to sharpen. I think some of them I left thicker than i needed. I try to use the "thick as a dime" rule but sometimes it's thicker than that (my eyes aren't the best). After heat treat I take it down a bit more but I don't like working with it when it's too sharp. (sanding the handle etc.) Anyway, when it comes to sharpening the new blade, it takes forever to do. I always use lansky/dmt combination to sharpen the knives but from this state it takes days. My fingers cramp up it takes so long. I've been trying to set an initial edge using my 1x30 and it's helped somewhat but, i end up with a fairly beef convex edge.

    Am I just leaving too much after the heat treat? Is there a simpler/faster way to set the initial geometry of the edge?

    My fingers and my diamond stones will appreciate any help you have.
     
  2. Mythtaken

    Mythtaken Staff Member CKM Staff

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    It's very possible you're leaving the edge too thick. If you're having trouble seeing it (I very much relate to that :( ) use some calipers to make sure the edge is where you want it.

    To deal with the immediate problem, the belt grinder is your best bet. Take it slow, using light passes to develop the edge. You can either go freehand or make a quick jig to hold the knife.
     
  3. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Before setting the edge I like to go down to about 0.015". That's about 1/4 the thickness of a dime.

    After heat treat, you need to finish the primary bevels down to the final thickness. The steel is hardened and really only the belt grinder is going to get you anywhere. I guess you could use sheet sandpaper and elbow grease, but whew, who has that much elbow grease? Like Tim suggested, use an caliper check the edge for uniform thickness before setting the edge. The cutting edge proper can be done with stones and a steady hand or I like to use the slack belt with a 220 grit belt. Being very careful not overheat and "blue" the edge. That will kill the hardness.

    Ah, such trickery we use.

    ;-)

    Dan
     
  4. ToddR

    ToddR Active Member

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    thanks guys. I figured i was just leaving far too much on. I have been reading a lot about convex edges on larger knives (i've made some big ones recently) and wasn't sure how much to leave before trying to sharpen. I've been trying to use a combination of my 1x30 with various grits and a leather strop belt and/or a paper wheel set. I'm not sure which i prefer but the belt definitely leaves a convex edge. That's cool for the bigger knives but i need to correct it on the smaller knives. I don't think it's as much of an issue on the smaller ones. The diamond stones i have make short work of the smaller blades.

    I will take more off after HT. I have calipers, i guess i need to use them more : )
     

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