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Canadian Grinder Supplier... Finally!!!

Discussion in 'Grinders' started by Shadnuke, Feb 15, 2019.

  1. Shadnuke

    Shadnuke Disabled dreamer...

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    Thanks for the heads up @dancom

    I will go the single speed route then. I've come across a couple options for speed control a single phase, but it doesn't look like it's worth the cost. I can get a c face motor here in town for cheap from Southern Rewind, so I will go that route. I don't have much space to work woth, so eliminating the belt is the better option in my case.
     
  2. Griff

    Griff Active Member

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    @Shadnuke The motor was from emotorsdirect.ca and the KBAC-27D I got from eBay. Emotors does sell KBC VFD’s, but they are a lil on the high price side.

    On a totally unrelated note, made my first knife in almost 2 years today...not good lol! All the machinery works perfectly, but I seem to be defective haha!

    #backtosquare1
     
  3. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    If anyone is claiming to be able to do a VFD for a single phase induction motor is pulling your leg. One would think that if it could be done someone would have done it on the past 150 years. The problem lies in the basic construction of the induction motor, pole orientation, start winding, capacitor etc. When you read the fine print they will always specify a motor type such as a shaded pole (ceiling fan), synchronous or permanent split capacitor, but NEVER a regular capacitor start induction motor like on your compressor of your old-school table saw. Here's a classic example... https://www.wolfautomation.com/blog/leesons-single-phase-unicorn/

    Grinders where the motor face mounts to the frame have several benefits include using less space. Also less vibration and virtually no alignment issues. C face is the way to go.

    Dan
     
  4. Shadnuke

    Shadnuke Disabled dreamer...

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    Yeah, it is WAAAAAAY more complicated to get a speed control on a single phase motor. After doing some reading, it can be done, but It's not cheap, and they don't tend to run at slow RPMs, so it's not worth it in the end anyway. How many HP would be best to run on the grinder, @dancom ? 1.5 or 2?
     
  5. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Horsepower largely depends on your supply. If you have 240 V in the shop go for the 2 horsepower. If you have 120 V then go for 1 to 1.5 hp. I have a four pole (1725 RPM) 1.5 hp motor will occasionally flip a 20 A breaker when starting. That's a big as I would go on a 120 V circuit.

    I do get a ton of motor related questions on my blog. I made this guide which I hope will answer many questions. http://dcknives.blogspot.com/p/grinder-motors.html

    Dan
     
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  6. Shadnuke

    Shadnuke Disabled dreamer...

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    1725 RPMs?! I thought 3600 RPMs was the go to speed? Or is that with a vfd? Would 1725 be slow enough with a single speed motor, to be able to use a small wheel attachment? And I will do a majority of my grinding with the platen, but if I decide to get a wheel, is 10 inches too large, or would I be better off with the 8 inch wheel?
     
  7. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    I do not have a four pole motor on a grinder. I referred to the four pole only in respect to the starting current. You can use a slower motor with a VFD no problem. Both my grinders have two pole motors.

    Wheel diameter has more to do with the concaves you want to grind. 12 or 10" for flat to shallow and 8 or even 6" for small blades and straight razors.
     
  8. Shadnuke

    Shadnuke Disabled dreamer...

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    Ahhh ok. I just figured it might have some sort of issue when it came to pulling the larger wheel. I know the little wheels spin a lot faster, so that's why I'm curious. It's recommended that you allow things down when you go to the tiny wheel. At least that's what I read recently.
     
  9. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    Yes, smalls wheels are pretty much the only reason I slow the motor down. Take the drive wheel diameter and divide it by the small wheel diameter then multiply that by the motor RPM and you'll quickly see that the 1/2" wheel is going at incredible speeds.
     
  10. Shadnuke

    Shadnuke Disabled dreamer...

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    Ok, I'll stay away from a small wheel attachment for now, or use the 1x30 for that, until I can get a VFD . I doubt it will ever happen, unless we decide that we are moving to somewhere I can actually install 220v service to the shed or garage. Thanks for the heads up!
     
  11. ToddR

    ToddR Putterer, Tinkerer, Waster of Time Staff Member

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    An oscillating spindle sander works pretty well for this too and they won't break the bank. Especially if you find a used one. I've used just sanding drums on my drill press before too. It works but it's just slower. They're a decent short term solution. I'm in the same boat. I'm saving up for a small wheel set myself.
     
  12. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    I use my OSS a lot. Especially when roughing the steel inside the choils. A couple of draw backs. It (mine) sounds like a shop-vac when running, the sleeves are fairly expensive and the choice of grits is limited. I did all the final sanding grits by hand with wet/dry sandpaper and used various diameters of dowel to get the roundy parts looking good.

    For a few years I used the little sanding drums in the drill press. These are great for shaping handles where you want to take your time removing material and get the shape to fit just right.
     
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  13. Shadnuke

    Shadnuke Disabled dreamer...

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    I would never use a drill press for sanding. The chuck isn't designed to have lateral pressure put on it. I've seen the entire chuck fall out of a drill press. It's not the end of the world, but a drill press with a Morse Taper shaft Chuck, can't handle lateral movement, and it will cause the chuck to fall out all the time once it's been buggered. Maybe I'll consider looking at a used OSS, but for a lot of the work, I will keep doing it with files until I become rich
     
  14. dancom

    dancom Dust Maker Best Shop Tool

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    You are pushing way too hard if you cause the chuck to fail. We're sanding on a large diameter surface, not milling.
     
  15. Shadnuke

    Shadnuke Disabled dreamer...

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    I've seen it happen with minimal pressure. One of the guy's at work years ago killed the OSS and decided to finish the sanding on the drill press because the truck was leaving to deliver the job. He finished the sanding, and it was maybe a few minutes worth of work. It was the last couple parts needed for a maple bunk bed. He finished it up and was halfway across the shop, when the chuck fell out, and It didn't take much to kill it. The boss was pretty pissed off when he found out that 2 main machines were out of commission
     
  16. ToddR

    ToddR Putterer, Tinkerer, Waster of Time Staff Member

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    I must have either great luck, a soft touch or the best drill press Canadian Tire's ever made : ) I've been doing this for years. As Dan suggests, it's very light pressure. I also raise the table and use the part of the drum closest to the chuck. It's never been a problem. To each his own, I guess.
     

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